What Game of Thrones teaches us about winning in sports

Game of thrones

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Is it a fight for the throne or are we just talking a game of sports (any) here? To me, what most certainly stands out are some of the inspiring life lessons of the game of thrones.

we learned from this series that could actually have so much in common with the highly-competitive world of sports.

While we are still entertaining the idea (hope you are with me), let’s pen down some of these common traits!

we learned from this series that could actually have so much in common with the highly-competitive world of sports.

While we are still entertaining the idea (hope you are with me), let’s pen down some of these common traits!

1. Passion for a cause

Game of Thrones had no shortage of strong characters, but some of them didn’t start out that way.

Daenerys, for example, was once a quiet girl, controlled by her overbearing brother.

Four seasons later, she’s a queen who has released thousands of slaves from custody and has taken a stance against human slavery.

Passion for a cause

Similarly, in sports, your passion for the game and the role you play will have a significant impact on other team members and the game as a whole, but you have to believe in yourself.

Be strong, take your stance and you will see your worth. Your ability to make that difference will only come through one thing: PRACTICE.

In more technical terms, practice is key to minimizing injury risks. Coaches that stress. regular practice during sessions as well as during off-season ensure two things that will help minimize head injuries,

2. Faster Reaction Times

What is reaction time? Reaction time is the ability of a player to respond quickly to a stimulus.

Average reaction time across all sports can range anywhere from 160–215 milliseconds.

In a game like a soccer, reaction time is critical in an attempt to constantly determine opportunities and threats on the field.

Soccer players constantly have to avoid collisions and dodge players moving at very high speeds. A goalie on an average only has about 0.3 seconds to react to a penalty kick.

Practice Practice Practice

Research suggests that practice plays a significant role in determining the athlete’s ability to respond quickly and effectively to their opponent’s actions sec to improved reaction time.

What practice also helps with is improvising technique. Although getting the technique right isn’t the end of the story,

incorporating appropriate and well-researched training programs will help reduce the chances of players hitting each other in their heads.

3. Embrace your “imperfections”

“Once you’ve accepted your flaws, no one can use them against you.” – Tyrion Lannister

When you start learning to embrace your flaws and accept that you are imperfect, you also start opening up to the imperfections of others.

You start being more patient, less impulsive and less irritated by the things that others do and which you normally find as being unpleasant traits of character. You are less prone to be judgmental.

In a team sport like soccer, every player is unique and they all come with their unique strengths and weaknesses.

A beginner level player might need more assistance in understanding technique compared to an elite level player.

Also, players with preexisting conditions like ADHD might sometimes display a certain level of aggression that may not work in favor of the team, however,

if coached the right way we can minimize the risk for injury.

A word for our coaches here, they too need to embrace the imperfections of their team members. Experimenting with different teaching methods to maximize output is key.

I couldn’t stress more on individual attention from coach to player.

Additionally, coaches who take the liberty to embrace their imperfections open doors to constructive criticism from players,

which to me will help develop meaningful relationships and an overall stronger team.

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